Featured in Media 2017-11-23T04:00:56+00:00

Obesity Linked to Low Sperm Quality, Semen Volume

Lower semen volume, number, concentration, and motility were found in obese men, as was a higher prevalence of oligospermia and asthenospermia, according to recent findings published in Andrologia.

In a retrospective study of 1285 men seeking infertility treatment at a clinic, 201 (15.6%) were clinically obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30). Age, BMI, smoking status, and a history of diabetes were assessed and adjusted for, as each has been identified as a risk factor for infertility.

Obese men were more likely to currently smoke or to have once smoked (12.3% obese vs 6.6% nonobese), and to have diabetes (68.6% obese vs 54.8% nonobese). Researchers examined sperm count, motility, concentration, and morphology using the computer-aided semen analysis (CASA).  Read More…..

Semen analysis

Computer-Aided Analysis: Obesity Affects Sperm Quality and Quantity

The first comparison by advanced computer-aided semen analysis (CASA) shows that sperm from obese infertile men is of poor quality, quantity, and morphology compared with that of infertile but normal-weight men. Results from a retrospective cohort study of 1285 infertile men show that a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher was associated with lower semen volume (P = .04), sperm count (P = .002), concentration (P = .01), progressive motility (P = .001), and total motility (P = .002) compared with men with a BMI in the normal range, according to Gottumukkala Achyuta Ramaraju, MBBS, of the Center for Assisted Reproduction, Krishna IVF Clinic, Visakhapatnam, India, and colleagues. “This is the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on CASA,” the study authors say in their report, published online September 19 in Andrologia. “The health and reproductive performance of spermatozoa in obese men are more likely to be compromised both qualitatively and quantitatively,” noted Dr Ramaraju in a statement. “Clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction.”  Read More…..

Association between obesity and sperm quality

There is awareness of likelihood of abnormal spermatozoa in obese men; however, results from previous studies are inconclusive. Advances in computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) enable precise evaluation of sperm quality and include assessment of several parameters. We studied a retrospective cohort of 1285 men with CASA data from our infertility clinic during 2016. Obesity (BMI ≥30) was associated with lower (mean ± SE) volume (−0.28 ± 0.12, p-value = .04), sperm count (48.36 ± 16.51, p-value = .002), concentration (−15.83 ± 5.40, p-value = .01), progressive motility (−4.45 ± 1.92, p-value = .001), total motility (−5.50 ± 2.12, p-value = .002), average curve velocity (μm/s) (−2.09 ± 0.85, p-value = .001), average path velocity (μm/s) (−1.59 ± 0.75, p-value = .006), and higher per cent head defects (0.92 ± 0.81, p-value = .02), thin heads (1.12 ± 0.39, p-value = .007) and pyriform heads (1.36 ± 0.65, p-value = .02). Obese men were also more likely to have (odds ratio, 95% CI) oligospermia (1.67, 1.15–2.41, p-value = .007) and asthenospermia (1.82, 1.20–2.77, p-value = .005). This is the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on CASA. Clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction.  Read More…..

Obesity and Male infertility

Obesity compromises sperm, study confirms

Sperm quality is significantly compromised by obesity and men need to reduce their weight and eat more fruits and vegetables to ensure healthy reproduction, say researchers. A large study of more than 1200 Indian men, published in medical journal Andologia, found obesity was associated with lower volume of semen, sperm count, concentration and motility, as well as greater sperm defects. The findings highlight a greater need to address weight loss among men before couples start assisted reproduction treatment, the authors say. Professor Kelton Tremellen, Gynaecologist and Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Flinders University agrees. “We can’t just put women through IVF to treat male infertility, often it’s required, but we must improve the quality of the sperm before we get to potential treatments like IVF,” Prof Tremellen told AAP. The other concern, he says, is that obesity can cause DNA damage in the sperm.  Read More…..

Obesity may adversely affect sperm quality

The journal Andrologia has published the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis. The findings suggest that clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction. In the study of 1285 men, obesity was associated with lower volume of semen, sperm count, concentration, and motility, as well as greater sperm defects. “The health and reproductive performance of spermatozoa in obese men are more likely to be compromised both qualitatively and quantitatively,” said Dr. Gottumukkala Ramaraju, lead author of the study. “Results from our present dataset suggest that efforts focusing on male weight loss before conception are warranted for couples seeking infertility treatment.”  Read More…..

Obese Men May Have a Harder Time Having Kids

A new study on male obesity and infertility says being overweight may make it harder for men to father a child.  Read More…..

Being Overweight Could Be Affecting Men’s Sperm Count And Quality

The study compared the sperm of more than 1,000 men using specialised computer software to determine how weight affects sperm count and sperm quality. Dr. Gottumukkala Ramaraju, lead author of the study, commented: “The health and reproductive performance of spermatozoa in obese men are more likely to be compromised both qualitatively and quantitatively. “Results from our present dataset suggest that efforts focusing on male weight loss before conception are warranted for couples seeking infertility treatment.” The research follows a 2012 study from Harvard School of Public Health which combined data from 14 studies comparing sperm count in overweight, obese, and healthy weight men, along with data from an infertility centre. The scientists found that men who were overweight were 11% more likely to have a low sperm count and 39% more likely to have no sperm in their ejaculate than men who were considered a healthy weight. Obese men were 42% more likely to have a low sperm count than their lighter peers and 81% more likely to produce no sperm.  Read More…..

Obesity crushes men’s fertility: Lower sperm count and quality linked to excess weight, study finds

Obese men have lower sperm counts and poorer quality sperm than their normal-weight peers, new research shows. The sperm of obese men travel more slowly and are less healthy, harming the chances of pregnancy, and increasing the time it takes couples to conceive. Doctors have long advised that maternal obesity contributes to infertility, but a new study from an Indian clinic provides the first conclusive evidence that the same is true of obese fathers. Obese fathers pass along their lower quality sperm and lower metabolisms to future generations, the according to the research from the Center for Assisted Reproduction in India. Dr. Gottumukkala Achyuta Ramaraju says that these new findings show that both parents need to be healthy to give them the greatest chances of conception.  Read More…..

Bad news, big guys: Being obese can hurt male fertility

Researchers at a fertility clinic in Visakhapatnam, India, analyzed sperm samples from 1,285 men. They found that men who were obese — meaning men who had a body mass index of 30 or higher — were found to have lower volumes of semen, lower sperm counts, lower sperm concentration, lower sperm motility and greater sperm defects. Scientists think the extra weight can disrupt the body’s hormone levels, throwing mens’ ratios of testosterone and estrogen out of whack. It’s not just a dude thing, either: The study also says that “the negative effect of obesity on fertility in women is clear.” The solution? Slimming down. Lead study author Dr. Gottumukkala Ramaraju says in a press release, “Results . . . suggest that efforts focusing on male weight loss before conception are warranted for couples seeking infertility treatment”.  Read More…..

As Men’s Weight Rises, Sperm Health May Fall

A widening waistline may make for shrinking numbers of sperm, new research suggests. Indian scientists studied more than 1,200 men and found that too much extra weight was linked to a lower volume of semen, a lower sperm count, and lower sperm concentration. In addition, sperm motility (the ability to move quickly through the female reproductive tract) was poor. The sperm had other defects as well, the researchers added. Poor sperm quality can lower fertility and the chances of conception. “It’s known that obese women take longer to conceive,” said lead researcher Dr. Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama Raju, from the Center for Assisted Reproduction at the Krishna IVF Clinic, in Visakhapatnam. “This study proves that obese men are also a cause for delay in conception,” he added. “Parental obesity at conception has deleterious effects on embryo health, implantation, pregnancy and birth rates,” Rama Raju explained.  Read More…..

Obese men more likely to have low sperm count and poor quality

Obese men have lower sperm counts and poorerquality sperm than their normal-weight peers, according to a recent study. The findings of the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis suggest that clinicians may need to factor in paternalobesity prior to assisted reproduction. In the study of 1285 men, obesity was associated with lower volume of semen, sperm count, concentration, and motility, as well as greater sperm defects. “The health and reproductive performance of spermatozoa in obese men are more likely to be compromised both qualitatively and quantitatively,” said lead author Dr. Gottumukkala Ramaraju.  Read More…..

More the excess weight, lower the sperm count, quality

The findings of the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis suggest that clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction. In the study of 1285 men, obesity was associated with lower volume of semen, sperm count, concentration, and motility, as well as greater sperm defects. “The health and reproductive performance of spermatozoa in obese men are more likely to be compromised both qualitatively and quantitatively,” said lead author Dr Gottumukkala Ramaraju. “Results from our present dataset suggest that efforts focusing on male weight loss before conception are warranted for couples seeking infertility treatment,” added Ramaraju. Read More…..